Tag Archives: review

“Look Where That Has Gotten Me”: The Potential Self-Awareness & Honesty of Poetry: Reading Tracey Knapp’s Mouth

21 Oct

Fantastic review of Tracey Knapp’s MOUTH by McKenzie Lynn Tozan
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Source: “Look Where That Has Gotten Me”: The Potential Self-Awareness & Honesty of Poetry: Reading Tracey Knapp’s Mouth

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13 Mar

Brilliant review of Allan Peterson’s PRECARIOUS by Kent Shaw (THE RUMPUS)

13 Mar

AN EXCERPT: 

“Oh, Allan Peterson. I thought I knew thee. I thought, To read an Allan Peterson poem is to expect the precarious, the poised, the anticipatory, the appointed. An aesthetics of the delicate edge. Imagine a soft rolling ball, the movement of one image tumbling so easily into the next, or an image that could shift its weight slightly, but enough that any reader, even the trained poetry reader, would wince, because it feels like the poem might possibly slip, as though Peterson is going to let the poem fall off this delicate, so comfortably soft ball. It won’t. It doesn’t. The miracle of Fragile Acts and All the Lavish in Common is how the poems keep their reader situated, balanced, between, OK, cared for. How? It’s Peterson. Oh, Allan Peterson! That’s all it takes. His is the bounty of Imaginative Intelligence. How was it poetry trusted him with this brand of intelligence? Every piece of an Allan Peterson poem feels like a machine of soft cogs with soft balls rolling among them, and all delicately snug against one another.”

PRECARIOUS BY ALLAN PETERSON REVIEWED BY KENT SHAW

New Review of The Bottom on Barn Owl Review

7 Aug

We are a few days late getting this posted on the blog, but Sarah Dravec has written a stellar review of Betsy Andrews’ The Bottom. 

Here is an excerpt:

You simply have to read this book to grasp the development of this piece. On a single page, for example, the narrative progresses from the numbness of human traffic along a beach to a horse named Patches to Donald Trump to the speaker’s dying and hallucinating grandmother, all working together to create affecting social commentary. Andrews’s expertly handled repetition and use of lists make this a book to remember, but the depth of this poem is seriously awe-inspiring. Everything about this book—the setting, the subject matter, the speaker, the human, animal, and natural characters, the title itself—pulls the reader down, down into Andrews’s insistence that we must be both cognizant and invigorated by the need to understand what we are doing to the world around us. I have read and reread the final lines:

           The face—if it’s face—turns to the observable; a purl of blue,
a dusky scratch, a naked singularity cast in a font 10 million years gone;
still, the unmistakable signature of the presence of absence;
past the moon named Egg and the moon named Eggshell,
a crack in the well of the night, hydromantic and, perhaps,
just bright enough for you to find us
humble telescope,
find us
 
You can read the rest of the review here.

Betsy Andrews’ The Bottom is live and available for purchase here.