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An Affective Singularity (Nate Pritts)

14 Jan

GUEST POST EXCERPT: http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/an-affective-singularity

Today’s guest post, an affective singularity, comes from Nate Pritts, who shared why he writes poetry back in July.

An Affective Singularity

We live in a time of conspicuous destruction. Material creation, the biological sphere, spiritual reality – each of these realms are being dragged apart resulting in a fractured world marked by implacable fragmentation, forced estrangement, a fundamental decoherence.

REVIEW EXCERPT: entropymag.org

The first poem, “A Responding Noise,” in Nate Pritts’ eighth collection, Decoherence (42 Miles Press), launches itself in response to an utterance unheard—as of yet—by the reader, yet crucial in presenting clues about the book’s trajectory and poetic commitments. The poem’s perspective largely belongs to a speaker invested in both navigating and describing a world seen as “…so tender” but also “…still so dark.” The disarming directness here of this speaker’s discourse, of the speaker’s stated desire to be open and honest with the reader, gains traction from the word “still.” Does “still” here refer to the ongoing condition of darkness? We can also open the possibility of “still” as the cessation of movement, the fear of what happens when we stop moving, as in Robert Creeley’s “I Know A Man”? Although many of the poems in Decoherence contain and describe individual people in motion (or considering various motions), the ways in which Pritts uses blank space also creates moments of stillness, pauses between clauses and images, allowing readers to experience the speaker’s uncertainties and second-guesses, pressurized by the idea of an elusive coherence.

Finish reading the review here.

 

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‘Decoherence’ was Reviewed by PW

17 Sep

Nate Pritt’s Decoherence was reviewed by Poets & Writer’s this week.

Excerpt from the review:
“In his cerebral eighth collection, Pritts (Post Human) cycles through the many metaphorical connotations of light, investigating each at close range, and laments the ephemerality of experience…”

To read the rest of the review click here.

West Trestle Review: Poetry Review of Tracey Knapp’s Mouth!

5 Jan

Excerpt:

Tracey Knapp’s first book, Mouth, was published by 42 Miles Press in September 2015.  Funny and wise, she gets right down to it.  Every poem will surprise you, and you won’t want the pages to end.  She can ‘turn a cricket into a field mouse’… She’s just that good.”

Read the review here!

San Francisco Chronicle: Poetry Review of Tracey Knapp’s Mouth!

1 Dec

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Excerpt:

“America loves a debut,” poet Louise Glück once said, introducing a prize-winning young writer before a reading. It’s true: We adore the gala arrival of a new voice, a first book, the heady sense of discovery that accompanies an author’s literary beginnings. But when the debut in question genuinely breaks new ground, readers get more than a Champagne buzz at a launch party. We journey into unmapped creative territory, experience the world clarified by a fresh eye, an unexpected vision.

Read the rest here!

Slate Book Review: The 27 Overlooked Books of 2015

1 Dec

Stephen Burt thinks you should check out Tracey Knapp’s “Mouth,” published by 42 Miles Press.

Excerpt:

Parts of Mouth feel like a mix tape from somebody with whom you’ve recently fallen in love; other parts feel like a very good anthology that might be called Casual Poems About Urban Living at, Say, 30. It’s a big book of vivacious poems small enough to memorize or take along in your satchel or purse: It’s also a font of verbal invention, new words that make new, and improve, a troubling Valentine’s Day or a sluggish commute, “a topological menu/ of the inner universe, the Idiot’s Guide/ to What We Are Able to Tolerate.”

Read the rest here!

New Review: Carrie Oeding’s Our List of Solutions

1 Dec

There is a new review of Carrie Oeding’s Our List of Solutions up at Boxcar Poetry Review written by Frank Montesonti.

Excerpt: 

Welcome to the neighborhood. Our List of Solutions by Carrie Oeding feels like an eccentric neighbor who shows up on your front porch with a pitcher of sangria and a plate of burnt sausages from the barbeque next door. And though we have been trained to act gruff and solitary, it’s a pleasant intrusion because this neighbor has great gossip and secretly, down deep, we are lonely and want a visitor.

Find the full review here.

“Look Where That Has Gotten Me”: The Potential Self-Awareness & Honesty of Poetry: Reading Tracey Knapp’s Mouth

21 Oct

Fantastic review of Tracey Knapp’s MOUTH by McKenzie Lynn Tozan
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Source: “Look Where That Has Gotten Me”: The Potential Self-Awareness & Honesty of Poetry: Reading Tracey Knapp’s Mouth