West Trestle Review: Poetry Review of Tracey Knapp’s Mouth!

5 Jan

Excerpt:

Tracey Knapp’s first book, Mouth, was published by 42 Miles Press in September 2015.  Funny and wise, she gets right down to it.  Every poem will surprise you, and you won’t want the pages to end.  She can ‘turn a cricket into a field mouse’… She’s just that good.”

Read the review here!

San Francisco Chronicle: Poetry Review of Tracey Knapp’s Mouth!

1 Dec

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Excerpt:

“America loves a debut,” poet Louise Glück once said, introducing a prize-winning young writer before a reading. It’s true: We adore the gala arrival of a new voice, a first book, the heady sense of discovery that accompanies an author’s literary beginnings. But when the debut in question genuinely breaks new ground, readers get more than a Champagne buzz at a launch party. We journey into unmapped creative territory, experience the world clarified by a fresh eye, an unexpected vision.

Read the rest here!

Slate Book Review: The 27 Overlooked Books of 2015

1 Dec

Stephen Burt thinks you should check out Tracey Knapp’s “Mouth,” published by 42 Miles Press.

Excerpt:

Parts of Mouth feel like a mix tape from somebody with whom you’ve recently fallen in love; other parts feel like a very good anthology that might be called Casual Poems About Urban Living at, Say, 30. It’s a big book of vivacious poems small enough to memorize or take along in your satchel or purse: It’s also a font of verbal invention, new words that make new, and improve, a troubling Valentine’s Day or a sluggish commute, “a topological menu/ of the inner universe, the Idiot’s Guide/ to What We Are Able to Tolerate.”

Read the rest here!

New Review: Carrie Oeding’s Our List of Solutions

1 Dec

There is a new review of Carrie Oeding’s Our List of Solutions up at Boxcar Poetry Review written by Frank Montesonti.

Excerpt: 

Welcome to the neighborhood. Our List of Solutions by Carrie Oeding feels like an eccentric neighbor who shows up on your front porch with a pitcher of sangria and a plate of burnt sausages from the barbeque next door. And though we have been trained to act gruff and solitary, it’s a pleasant intrusion because this neighbor has great gossip and secretly, down deep, we are lonely and want a visitor.

Find the full review here.

21 Oct

“Look Where That Has Gotten Me”: The Potential Self-Awareness & Honesty of Poetry: Reading Tracey Knapp’s Mouth

21 Oct

Fantastic review of Tracey Knapp’s MOUTH by McKenzie Lynn Tozan
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Source: “Look Where That Has Gotten Me”: The Potential Self-Awareness & Honesty of Poetry: Reading Tracey Knapp’s Mouth

TWO POEMS TO READ AT 4:13 PM

8 Oct
G’afternoon’, South Bend & beyond!
It’s 4:13 PM on the eighth day of October.
Here are two poems and a photograph of a bass guitar…

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GHOST
By Leila Chatti

I like how easily I see
through you. There,

the slumbering bulb
of your heart

between the dead-branch-
thicket of your ribs.

Your fingers spindles
of air, slightly blue around

each tip. All
day I feel their cold

constant touch. You are heavier
than I thought; you cast long shadows

in the dark. I want to spend all night
talking into your silence.

In bed, you curl your whole nothing
against me, arm at my waist

my arm, breath on
my neck, my breath.

* poem from decomP, August 2014 (http://www.decompmagazine.com/ghost.htm)


THINGS THAT ARE MUFFLED OPEN
By Kristin Abraham

We start off slow like this, red. Watch
the stones tipping off our shoes, the snow.
Each second small and aspirin-flavored,
the learning of childhood. May I sit? May I
stand? Look both ways, please & thank you.
(Curtsy to the crowd.) (Pause for applause.)
May I sit? The world is gathering itself up
to answer, making hesitant check-marks.
May I stand? Lists of hurt already long
enough. Long enough, the world begins,
begins a sigh. So we’re looking at the
cracks in the lampshade. Looking for
the yellow to come through, where there’s biology: electricity: math, meaning
the more we touch it, the more it spreads.
Like menthol, heat rash. The louder it gets.
Stand back; I’m going to need that air.

* poem from Little Red Riding Hood Missed the Bus, Subito Press, 2008
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